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Alstone

Alstone

Buildings in the village of Alstone are a mixture of Cotswold stone and timber frame. The church is a good example. St Margaret's is Norman with seventeenth century restoration. One of the windows in the south wall contains fragments of medieval glass. There are a handful of other half-timbered buildings in the village, alongside those built in Cotswold stone. The saxon name for this village was Aelfsigestun.

Ampney St Mary

Ampney St Mary

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Bishops Cleeve

Bishops Cleeve

Bishops Cleeve

Bishops Cleeve

In the 8th century, there was a village on this site by the name of Timbingcton. At that time a monastery stood close to the present site of the church. The church of Saint Michael and All Angels is Norman and was built on the site of the Saxon church. In a small room above the south door, Bishops Cleeve's first school was begun in the early 19th century. Educational drawings are still visible on the walls.

Brimpsfield

Brimpsfield

The church of St Michael and All Angels is situated 800 feet up in the Cotswolds, in the village of Brimpsfield. The unusual tower was added in the 15th century. Near to the church, once stood Brimpsfield Castle, held by the Giffard family from the time of the conquest until 1322.

Castle Eaton

Castle Eaton

Chedworth

Chedworth

The church of St Andrews is originally Norman. The lower sections of the tower date from 1100. The church houses a copy of the 'Breeches Bible', an early protestant translation of the Bible into English. It was written by English scholars who fled to Geneva during the tyrannical reign of Queen Mary. The translation was heavily influenced by William Tyndale's work thirty-five years earlier.

Leckhampton Hill

Leckhampton Hill

Despite the impressive name of 'Devil's Chimney', this tower of limestone rock is probably man made

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Coln St Dennis

Coln St Dennis

Coln St Dennis takes its name from the river that runs through the village. The church of St James the Great retains most of its original Norman characteristics. The buttressed section of the tower is Norman, with the narrower top added in the 15th century.

Duntisbourne Rouse

Duntisbourne Rouse

Duntisbourne Rouse

Duntisbourne Rouse

The Church of St Michael in Duntisbourne Rouse has a saddleback tower dating back to 1587 whilst the nave dates back to Saxon times. A couple of kilometres north west of Duntisbourne Rouse, there is a neolithic long barrow, accompanied by a 'Hoar Stone' and several smaller stones.

Farmington

Farmington

At the centre of Farmington's village green is the former pumphouse, built in 1874. The roof was presented by the citizens of Farmington, Connecticut, USA in July 1935 to mark their 300 year centenial. The pumphouse is still used at Christmas time, when the villagers use the downpipe to hold a Christmas Tree.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Just at the top of the west facing escarpment of Cleeve Hill, are the remains of an Iron Age Hill Fort, the westerly edge of which, has been chiseled away by centuries of quarrying.

Lancaut

Lancaut

Lassington

Lassington

This solitary Tower is all that remains of the saxon church of St Oswald. The church did once have a nave and chancel but the body of the church was demolished in 1975 after falling into disrepair. Restoration in the 1870s had damaged the structure of the church, making further restoration uneconomic.

Lower Slaughter

Lower Slaughter

A miles walk to the south-east of Upper Slaughter, along the banks of the river Eye, brings you to Lower Slaughter, an archetypal Cotswold stone village.

Lower Slaughter

Lower Slaughter

One of the most interesting and conspicuous buildings in Lower Slaughter, is the charming old watermill with its tall red brick chimney. It was built in the nineteenth century for milling corn, and last used commercially in 1958.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Beech woodland on the slopes of Cleeve Hill. This small woodland lies on the edge of the Bill Smyllie Butterfly Reserve.

Minster Lovell

Minster Lovell

On the banks of the Windrush, the romantic ruin of Minster Lovell Hall, After the failed Lambert Simnell Rising in 1487, Francis the 13th Lord Lovell is said to have taken refuge here. The Hall has been a ruin since it was dismantled in 1747.

Minster Lovell

Minster Lovell

Minster Lovell

Minster Lovell

Minster Lovell

Minster Lovell

Prestbury

Prestbury

Prestbury, reputedly one of the most haunted villages in England, lies on the outskirts of Cheltenham, at the foot of the Cotswold escarpment. The church of St Mary dates back to the 12th century though it has undergone substantial restoration in the 15th and 19th centuries.

Prestbury

Prestbury

Prestbury

Prestbury

Prestbury

Prestbury

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Old quarry workings on Cleeve Hill, cut from the sides of a small valley above a disused washpool and sheep dip.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Severn Vale

Severn Vale

At 330m, Cleeve Hill is the highest point on a Jurassic escarpment that stretches from Dorset to the North Sea coast.

Sherbourne Brook

Sherbourne Brook

Sherbourne Brook flows through Sherbourne Park, part of the estate that was created in the 1630s by John 'crump' Dutton, Civil War politician.

Shipton Oliffe

Shipton Oliffe

The name Shipton derives from the saxon for sheep farmstead. The church of St Oswald dates from the 12th and 13th centuries with restoration carried out in 1903. The bellcote is 13th century.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Southam

Southam

Stanley Pontlarge

Stanley Pontlarge

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

The two trees known as Threesisters stand proudly on the western edge of Cleeve Common, overlooking Cheltenham and the Severn Valley.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Tintern Abbey

Tintern Abbey

Tintern Abbey, a Cistercian abbey, founded in 1131, in the Wye Valley. The Cistercian monks (or White Monks) who lived at Tintern followed the Rule of St Benedict. The abbey buildings of today represent a 400 year period of building with the Great Church being built between 1269 and 1301. 400 years of monastic life came to an end in 1536 when Abbot Wyche was forceed to surrender the abbey to the king.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Upper Slaughter

Upper Slaughter

The church of St Peter is originally Norman but underwent vigorous restoration in the nineteenth century.

Upper Slaughter

Upper Slaughter

There are several possibile reasons for the sinister name: It may be named after Norman Knight, Philip de Sloitre, or the sloe trees that once grew here, whilst the most likely origin, is the saxon word 'Slohtre' for 'muddy place'.

Little Washbourne

Little Washbourne

The norman church of St Mary in Little Washbourne, has been retired and is now cared for by The Redundant Churches fund.

Widford

Widford

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Windrush

Windrush

The church of St Peter stands overlooking the quiet Cotswold village of Windrush. St Peters has stood here since Norman times. One interesting feature is the south doorway which is surrounded by strange animal carvings.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill

A settlement was recorded here as early as 1166, though now the only occupants are the jackdaws and ravens. The farm was abandoned in the mid 20th century after a couple of decades use. Farm workers had lived here, though the house was pulled down to prevent illegal occupancy.

Cleeve Hill

Cleeve Hill